Children & Type One Diabetes

by Dr. Ester Beyo Anidjar
( 83 Greenfield Road Woodridge N.Y. )

Dear Friend and Caring Person,


Knowing that you go the natural way with health, please, I would like your opinion about my case.

I have eighteen grandchildren: Bless them. My six year old, a smart and handsome boy, was diagnosed with diabetes 1 about three months ago. My daughter, mother of eight is devastated, especially because she always believed in natural medicine, while her husband never did. Facing this problem, he took over the responsibility of all insulin procedures; which it is quiet an intensive job.

I advised my daughter to give the boy only foods permissible without insulin, but her husband argues that the boy needs to grow and can't live in such a restrictive diet.

Husband and wife, both good quality religious people that never argued, now do - all the time.
Meals are only prepared for little David - and no one else. The two younger ones still get care from the mother since one of them is still nursing. The other kids are on their own hiding to eat their rice cake and cheese, spaghetti and ice cream.
I suggested to make a large meal for everyone to enjoy but my daughter, who is a nurse, is too busy cleaning, bathing the children and doing the laundry; besides she told me that they do not like to eat what David eats.

I know that there is a way out of all these insulin treatment if they just try to follow a diet of only - vegetables and protein - but my son-in-law says that if I learn enough about this condition, I would understand how my diet and no insulin intake would kill the boy.

Did children with diabetes died in our times?

Please, if possible, give me an immediate answer
Thanking you in advance, from
Grandma Ester

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Nov 13, 2013
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Type 1 Diabetes
by: Anonymous

I was diagnosed T1 at the age of 8 in 1959. Please don't try to control a child's diabetes with a diet of vegetables and protein. Yes, they need a healthy diet but you need insulin all the time. Insulin is a growth hormone and a T1 has to have it to grow and function. Nowadays, diabetics can take a long acting insulin for the basal rate and count the carbs when they eat and take a bolus of fast acting insulin to cover it. It's possible for the diabetic to eat normally with the family. The child's insulin needs will change as she grows. A T1 cannot do without insulin!! There is so much I wish I could share with you about diabetes to help this little angel live with T1.

Sep 11, 2013
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Type One Diabetes & Family
by: Grandma

Hello Grandma Ester,

Oh my goodness! I totally understand your concerns about your daughters family and your grandson. I went through a family situation very much like yours about 6 years ago. My youngest granddaughter was diagnosed with Type One Diabetes when she was three years old. I know what my son and daughter-in-law went through emotionally and physically trying to deal with this but they only had one child, I can't imagine going through this with 8 children in the family and one that is still nursing.

I do totally agree with you that the family really needs to get a grip on the situation and start feeding the family together. This would be the perfect time to start teaching the older children to pitch in and take some of the burden off their mother. I understand what your son-in-law is going through with making his son priority right now. I do believe diet is a really important key to controlling diabetes but I understand why he is scared to death to take his son off the insulin. Once you all can get the diet under control you can slowly decrease the insulin.

The first thing I'd suggest is going to a website; www.nomilk.com and start doing some research there. I was amazed at all the information I found there about milk and diabetes. Another thing I'd suggest is start your grandson on daily doses of magnesium. Studies have found a link between diabetes and magnesium deficiency. This is another area you might want to start doing research. Once you find points of interest print them out and let your son-in-law read your research and hopefully it will help him with getting things under control.

I realize how frustrating all this can be and the worry you must be going through to help keep the family together through this time. I will keep you and your daughters family in my thoughts and prayers.

Grandma

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